It’s a strange time, huh? Especially for those of us working in film. Big film releases have been pushed back, often ending up on streaming platforms instead of the big screen. Cinemas have been finding it nearly impossible to open safely, so drive-in movies are suddenly seeing a resurgence (or appearing in our lives for the first time). Production is slowly starting to trickle back after grinding to a halt in March but for a lot of us freelancers that power the industry, times are hard.

Keep on keeping on

So I was pleased to find that graphic design work was continuing to roll in – with an increase in one particular area: production company logos. Despite our industry taking a gut punch, people were preparing for the future of film and signalling their commitment to making more and more work.

But thinking about it, I shouldn’t have been so surprised. Ours is an industry of dreamers. Of storytellers. Of dig-your-heels-in, get-the-job-done determination. We thrive on making the impossible, possible. And these jobs have given me a valuable reminder: there is still opportunity out there.

Storytelling doesn’t stop

The human need for stories never goes away. And during this pandemic people have been consuming more and more screen-based entertainment. At the same time, the gap in production means that platforms are crying out for quality content. Filmmakers with completed films suddenly have more negotiating power, production is beginning to innovate around safety guidelines, and those of us with an eye on the future are preparing to hit the ground running.

The future belongs to those who can see it

Filmmaking is hard. And it just got harder. But those who can persevere and get their films made, may have the chance to really shine. An investment in good marketing will work even harder for you now as even more people may see it.

Think about what you want to communicate as a filmmaker or production company. What values, ethos and qualities do you want to convey? Fun or serious? Arthouse or blockbuster? Slick? Pioneering? A commitment to a particular kind of stories or voices? A good professional logo will position you and your company as one to watch – showing your commitment to your craft now, and for the long haul.

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About 

Adam Blakemore is a graphic designer specialising in design for film and theatre. After over 13 years working in the industry, he recently founded his own agency Strelka - where some of his favourite projects have included poster designs for Neill Blomkamp’s Zygote and The Vanishing starring Gerard Butler. He loves working with indie filmmakers, and can offer a discount for Raindance members, so get in touch to discuss posters, logos, pitch decks and any other design needs you have.

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