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2018.10.20


Introduction to Comic Book and Graphic Novel Scriptwriting

Rated 5.00 out of 5 based on 2 customer ratings
(2 customer reviews)

$197.90 $178.11

Raindance members get 20% off this course
Date: Saturday 20th October, 10.00am – 5.00pm
Location: Raindance Film Centre, 10a Craven Street, London, WC2N 5PE or Online
10% early bird discount up to one month before the start of the course

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Description

Have you ever considered how Comic Book or Graphic Novel can help scriptwriters?
Do you think your novel or film screenplay could be adapted into a graphic novel?
Does your project have a Transmedia element that could include a digital or webcomic?

Presented by #1 New York Times Bestselling List and Eagle Award winning comic book and graphic novel writer and screenwriter Tony Lee (Doctor Who, Superboy, 2000AD, Spider Man, X-Men, Battlestar Galactica) takes you through the steps to turn your idea into a comic book or graphic novel and the steps you need to take to get yourself published, in a revised for 2018 version of his acclaimed one day masterclass.

graphic novelWith over thirty years experience as a professional writer, and almost fifteen years worth of experience as a comics creator for both UK and US publishers, Tony’s worked in all areas of the industry, from DC to Marvel, and Image Comics to Titan Publishing. And with a new career emerging in film and TV screenwriting in both the UK and the US, Tony’s recently written an episode of DOCTORS for BBC One, and has projects in development with Gianni Nunnari’s Hollywood Gang, Noel Clarke’s Unstoppable Entertainment, ITV Studios, BoxFly Media and Amazon / Audible among many others.

This is your chance to learn from a master in writing for comic books and graphic novel script writing.

10:00    Introduction

10:15    It’s Not The Easier Option

What stumbling blocks a writer can find in their way when moving from screen to sequential art storytelling.

  • Why scripting comics isn’t ‘easy’ – and why a comic of your screenplay won’t sell your screenplay
  • Comparison: Screenplay / Novel / Script, using an example
  • Visual Thinking and why it’s great – the original spark of an idea
  • The ‘Coulda, Shoulda, Woulda’ moment
  • Who? What? Why? When? Where?
  • Why ‘working backwards’ helps you move forwards
  • Storytelling: The characters – what do they want? Why do we care?
  • Storytelling: The conflict – protagonists and antagonists
  • Storytelling: Keeping the reader invested over time
  • Describing your characters – how will an artist know?

11:45    Writing The Story

Now you have the initial idea, it’s time to build on that frame.

  • Comparison: Anthology / One-shot / Mini Series / Ongoing / Graphic Novel / Web Series
  • The High Concept / Elevator Pitch
  • The restraints of a comic script (length, page turn etc)
  • The importance of the full synopsis
  • Chekov’s mantelpiece rule – and why it’s vital to comics
  • The rising act structure
  • Subplots and supporting characters
  • Is your story all it can be – the joys of hindsight
  • Devil’s Advocate – does your idea stand up to scrutiny?

13:00 Lunch

Your chance to network and form new alliances with like minded screenwriters and filmmakers.

14:00    Writing The Script

Now you have the story, we now master the dos and don’ts of scripting it.

  • The full synopsis – the ‘treatment’ for comics
  • Breaking it down: Scene by scene
  • Breaking it down: Page by page
  • Comparison: Full Script / Plot-Art-Dialogue (‘Marvel’ style)
  • Know your comic terms – the language of the comic script
  • Types of panel / how many to a page
  • The Temporal Flux of Panel vs Time
  • Dialogue: Why a writer should always letter at least one page.
  • Comparison: Screenplay dialogue / Comic dialogue
  • Action Verses Spoken Word
  • Adaptations of existing material
  • Licensed Properties and Preexisting Characters

15:30    The Industry

Now you have your script, what do you do with it?

  • Self Publishing: finding an artist.
  • Self Publishing: Percentage or Page Rate
  • Getting known: Webcomic / Vanity Press / Small Press
  • Conventions / Networking – the dos and don’ts
  • Submitting to the established comic book companies
  • Know your target – does your story match their style?
  • How much does an agent help a comic creator
  • Selling yourself rather than your story

16:30    Graphic Novel and Comic Book Live Ammo!

Students pitch their ideas in front of the class to get individual feedback.

18:00    To the Pub for Networking Drinks

Remember to bring your business cards!

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2 reviews for

2018.10.20


Introduction to Comic Book and Graphic Novel Scriptwriting

  1. Rated 5 out of 5

    Edo

    Tony Lee provided excellent insight into both the business of Comic Books and the creative process behind his writing. The course gives your the tools and resources you need to kickstart your writing.

  2. Rated 5 out of 5

    Simon Craven (verified owner)

    I found this course an excellent use of a day for anyone who’s writing stories for a visual medium. It’s a packed day and I feel as if I had the benefit of two classes in one.
    Tony’s record as a writer for comics is legendary, and his long experience gave him an almost endless supply of first-hand tales from his career. It’s a long time since I’ve worked in print so it was good to hear his thorough discussion of how the physical constraints of the comic book as a medium affect the structure and pacing of stories. The insights into the commercial and practical realities of the comics industry, and the various ways that artists and writers work together, were most illuminating.
    It was also a pleasure to hear Tony’s personal approach to developing and telling engaging stories. Much of this is of direct interest to screenwriters as well as those developing comics scripts, and reflects his current experience as a busy writer in TV and film in addition to his comics work.
    I came away full of ideas and knowing a lot more than when I went in. I’d strongly recommend this day to anyone who’s ever wondered if they could write for comics, and especially to those who also have an interest in TV and film.

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