moet-british-independent-film-awards

It has been a great year for film, with exciting writing emerging from wonderful talent. The nominees for best screenplay goes to:

Jonathan Asser- Starred Up

Aside from his writing talents, Asser is an award-winning and published psychotherapist and poet who developed a unique approach to working with gang members in UK prisons. His experiences have enforced his writing and inspired him to write Starred up (2013) for his first feature-length screenplay

Clio Barnard- The Selfish Giant

Clio won critical acclaim for her debut The Arbour and has now been hailed as a significant voice in British film for The Selfish Giant. Barnard was educated has a first class BA (Hons) in  with distinction in fine art and received a post-graduate diploma in electronic imaging and before launching her film career,she worked in the visual arts; she has shown her work at MoMA and Tate. In an interview with Tank magazine, Barnard talks of making film for the first time: “I studied fine arts and have a visual arts background but I used film from pretty early on. To begin with, I was using a handheld camera to record my charcoal drawings and that’s how I got into making films.”

Steven Knight- Locke

After graduating with a degree in English Literature at University College London, Knight became a copywriter/producer for an advertising agency in Birmingham and then moved onto Capital Radio. In 1988 Michael Whitehall started a freelance writing partnership writing for television such as Canned Carrott, Commercial breakdown and The Detectives. Knight also devised game shows such as Who Wants to be a Millionaire with David Briggs before moving onto film and theatre.

Hanif Kureishi- Le Week-end

Born in South London and educated at Kings College London, Kureishi began his career as a 70’s pornography writer under the pseudonym of Antonia French. Making his vivid mark in British filmmaking, Kureishi addresses issues of race, immigration, nationalism and sexuality in all of his films.

Jeff Pope, Steve Coogan- Philomena

Jeff Pope- Pope’s first media job was reporting for the Ealing Gazette until he joined London Weekend Television in 1973 as a researcher in current affairs. Making his way through the TV industry, his credits started rolling out in the 90’s. Recently his credits have included the Fattest Man in Britain   and the BAFTA winning See No Evil: The Moors Murders.

Steve Coogan- The multi talented Steve Coogan covers all bases; he is a well known actor, writer, stand-up comedian, impressionist, writer and producer. Coogan  was born in Manchester and started his career in theatre after being accepted into the Manchester based theatre company New Music and Manchester Metropolitan School of Theatre. In 1992 Coogan took stand-up shows up to Edinburgh and won the Perrier award for his performance alongside John Thomson. His rise to fame came with his involvement in On the Hour with Chris Morris and his conception of socially awkward and politically incorrect personality Alan Partridge.

The Moet British Independent film Award winners will be announced on Sunday December 8th at Old Billingsgate in London in an event hosted by the actor and BIFA patron James Nesbitt. The event will be live cast by Film3Sixty.

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